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Tropical Storm Dean was the fourth named storm of the 1995 Atlantic hurricane season. Dean formed on July 28 in the eastern Gulf of Mexico to the south of the Florida Panhandle, moved west, west-northwest, and then gained tropical storm status just before its landfall near Freeport, Texas. Dean dissipated over central Texas on August 2.

Dean caused $500,000 (1995 USD) in damage but no fatalities.

Dean at peak intensity and at landfall
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FormationJuly 28, 1995
Dissipation August 2, 1995
Highest winds 45 mph
Lowest pressure 999 mbar
Deaths None reported
Damages $500,000 (1995 USD)
Areas affectedTexas
Part of the 1995 Atlantic hurricane season

Meteorological History

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Dean originated from a broad, quasi-stationary mid-level trough extending from the northeastern Gulf of Mexico through Florida. On July 27, a weak cyclonic circulation was noted by buoy observations in the eastern Gulf of Mexico accompanied by pressure falls of about 2.5 mb in 24 hours. During that time, satellite imagery revealed that the convection was disorganized, but the upper-level outflow pattern was beginning to become established. On July 28, high resolution visible satellite imagery indicates that the system developed a low-level circulation center. Based on that as well as ship reports, it is estimated that the system became Tropical Depression Four at 1800 UTC July 28 while located about 345 miles southeast of New Orleans, Louisiana. A reconnaissance aircraft was dispatched to the depression and found a pressure of 1008 mb and flight-level winds of 32 knots. The depression moved to the west-northwest under the influence of a well-established mid-level high pressure area located over the central United States. The depression intensified little as it moved west-northwest. The depression was under continuous reconnaissance surveillance and, during the time between the last fix at 1712 UTC July 30, the pressure within the cyclone dropped from 1005 mb to 999 mb. In addition, flight-level winds increased from 45 mph to 60 mph. Based on this, it is estimated that the depression became Tropical Storm Dean at 1800 UTC July 30 while located about 60 miles from the upper Texas coast. A few hours later, Dean made landfall near Freeport, Texas. Tropical cyclones have occasionally intensified just before making landfall in that area in the past. Shortly after landfall, Dean weakened to a tropical depression and continued northwest through Texas. Dean became nearly stationary over northwestern Texas for 24 to 36 hours, producing heavy rainfall as it did so. At 0000 UTC August 3, Dean dissipated as it merged with a frontal zone.

Impact

Dean caused most of its damage from its heavy rainfall. Heavy rains of 6 to 18 inches occured across a large portion of Texas. The highest rainfall total was 16.78 inches near Monroe City. A total of 38 houses were flooded in southeastern Texas because of Dean's rainfall. The freshwater flooding resulted in the evacuation of 20 families in Chambers County. Dean's storm surge was relatively minor, ranging from 3 to 5 feet. A portion of Texas State Highway 87 was flooded from the storm surge, although no significant property damage occured because of it. Minor beach erosion and street flooding was reported on Galveston Island. The highest winds on land were 51 mph at Scholes Field. There were two confirmed tornadoes because of Dean. One touched down at High Island in Galveston County, and the other one touched down near Anahuac. Both tornadoes were ranked F0 on the Fujita scale and caused minor damage. Total damage in Texas from Dean was estimated at $500,000 (1995 USD). Dean caused no fatalities.

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Rainfall totals from Tropical Storm Dean.

Lack of Retirement

Because damage was minimal, the name Dean was not retired in the Spring of 1996 by the World Meteorological Organization. It was used again during the 2001 Atlantic hurricane season, and was used again during the 2007 Atlantic hurricane season. It will likely be retired in the Spring of 2008 by the WMO because of its destruction that it caused in 2007.

See Also

1995 Atlantic hurricane season

References

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/1995dean.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tropical_Storm_Dean_%281995%29

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